Battle of the Burbs: Centurion East vs Pretoria East

Here in Pretoria we’re spoiled for choice when it comes to living in a great suburb. From Southdowns to Groenkloof to Mooikloof, there are perks to living in all these places. We decided to have a closer look at the eastern side of things and see what life is like in the Pretoria East and Centurion East neighbourhoods.





Pretoria East The Pretoria East neighbourhood is made up of established suburbs like Equestria, Faerie Glen, Garsfontein, Waterkloof and Erasmuskloof as well as some of the newer suburban additions like Olympus, Mooikloof Ridge and Woodhill. Pretoria East’s biggest drawcard is that it’s a neighbourhood that provides residents with a relaxed, suburban lifestyle while still offering plenty of the advantages that city life offers.

The area boasts a selection of spacious nature reserves like Klapperkop Nature Reserve, Austen Roberts Bird Sanctuary, Moreleta Nature Reserve, Groenkloof Nature Reserve and Faerie Glen Nature Reserve that comfortably cater to outdoor and family activities. You’ll also find top-notch golf courses like Woodhill and Silver Lakes in the Pretoria East area. At the same time, Pretoria East is home to some of the hottest hangouts Gauteng has to offer: the new Time Square Casino Complex, the Menlyn Maine precinct, trendy shopping spots like Brooklyn Mall and Menlyn Park as well as an array of exclusive night clubs, theatres and newly opened restaurants.

Pretoria East provides parents with a selection of good schools too. Whether you prefer steadfast traditional schooling from legendary institutions like Pretoria Boys and Girls High, Affies, Menlo Park, WHPS, Anton van Wouw, Constantia Park and Lynnwood, or if you’re looking to keep up with educational trends and enroll your kiddos in Curro or Sparks, you’ll be spoilt for choice if you’re living in Pretoria East. With quite a number of embassies located in the area, you will also find this neighbourhood houses international schools like the Deutsche Schule Pretoria and the new Chinese International School.

It offers people who live here a suburban lifestyle with diverse schooling, shopping and entertainment options. Every October, all of this is set to the trademark purple backdrop of hundreds of Jacaranda trees in beautiful full bloom.



Centurion East

The Centurion East neighbourhood is made up of established suburbs like Irene, Cornwall Hill, Pierre van Ryneveld, Zwartkops, Hennopspark and Lyttleton as well as newer places like Midstream and Southdowns. One of the best aspects of living in Centurion East is the country-living lifestyle it offers, while still providing easy access to main roads to Pretoria and Joburg as well as the Centurion Gautrain station. This neighbourhood is a cosmopolitan mix of gated communities, spacious old-school homes and upmarket lifestyle estates.

The country feel of this area is greatly attributed to the ever-popular and scenic Irene Dairy Farm, the original venue of the renowned Irene Flea Market, the tree-lined streets and the presence of the places like the Rietvlei Nature Reserve and Zwartkops Resort on the banks of the Hennops River. But don’t let the countryside lifestyle fool you! Some of Pretoria’s leading luxury establishments are also situated in Centurion East.



The African Pride Lodge Irene Country Estate, Leriba Lodge and Klein Kaap Boutique Hotel are well-known luxury accommodation and conferencing venues situated in the Centurion East area. With shopping centres like Southdown Centre, Jean Crossing, the massive Centurion Mall and the soon-to-be expanded Irene Village Mall, the retail scene also spoils east Centurions for choice. It's also a hotspot for newer educational institutions; Southdowns College, Curro Midstream and SPARKS Centurion are all located in this neighbourhood.

Centurion East offers people who live here a countryside suburban lifestyle with modern shopping and schooling options. Centurion East is like a mini town located inside the city, and definitely one of the most scenic neighbourhoods in all of Pretoria.

By Jana van der Linde